Addiction Treatment Services,Traverse City, MI

A Public Health Strategy

July 2, 2014

 

Addiction Treatment Services (ATS) has a daunting task to consider.  Our community, like much of the country is in the midst of an epidemic.  Drug abuse, especially from prescription medication, is having effects on our community like nothing we have ever seen.  For many years, ATS has played a passive role, which is appropriate for a treatment provider.  We were here to provide support and treatment to individuals who needed it.  That was our primary concern, and we did a good job.  Unfortunately, the issue is MUCH bigger than us, and because there are few organized efforts to do more, we feel it is now our moral responsibility to increase our engagement on the local, state and national level.  We ALL must demand a public health strategy if we are ever going to gain any traction on addressing the damage substance abuse issues are causing our communities. 

The impact on America’s children, adults, and communities is enormous (www.samhsa.gov):

  • The annual total estimated societal cost of substance abuse in the United States is $510.8 billion.
  • By 2020, behavioral health disorders will surpass all physical diseases as a major cause of disability worldwide.
  • In 2008, an estimated 9.8 million adults aged 18 and older in the United States had a serious mental illness. Two million youth aged 12 to 17 had a major depressive episode during the past year.
  • In 2009, an estimated 23.5 million Americans aged 12 and older needed treatment for substance use.
  • Half of all lifetime cases of mental and substance use disorders begin by age 14 and three-fourths by age 24.
  1. Prevention of Substance Abuse and Mental Illness—Creating communities where individuals, families, schools, faith-based organizations, and workplaces take action to promote emotional health and reduce the likelihood of mental illness, substance abuse including tobacco, and suicide.
  2. Trauma and Justice—Reducing the pervasive, harmful, and costly health impact of violence and trauma by integrating trauma-informed approaches throughout health, behavioral health, and related systems and addressing the behavioral health needs of people involved in or at risk of involvement in the criminal and juvenile justice systems.
  3. Recovery Support—Partnering with people in recovery from mental and substance use disorders and family members to guide the behavioral health system and promote individual-, program-, and system-level approaches that foster health and resilience; increase permanent housing, employment, education, and other necessary supports; and reduce discriminatory barriers.
  4. Health Reform—Increasing access to appropriate high quality prevention, treatment, and recovery services; reducing disparities that currently exist between the availability of services for mental and substance use disorders compared with the availability of services for other medical conditions; and supporting integrated, coordinated care, especially for people with behavioral health and other co-occurring health conditions.
  5. Health Information Technology—Ensuring that the behavioral health system, including community providers, peer and prevention specialists, fully participates with the general health care delivery system in the adoption of health information technology (HIT) and interoperable electronic health records (EHRs).
  6. Data, Outcomes, and Quality—Realizing an integrated data strategy and a national framework for quality improvement in behavioral health care that will inform policy, measure program impact, and lead to improved quality of services and outcomes for individuals, families, and communities.
  7. Public Awareness and Support—Increasing the understanding of mental and substance use disorders and the many pathways to recovery to achieve the full potential of prevention, help people recognize mental and substance use disorders and seek assistance with the same urgency as any other health condition, and make recovery the expectation (see our events page).
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A Unique Opportunity...

January 7, 2014

Addiction Treatment Services (ATS) affirms national efforts to end the stigma and discrimination associated with addiction.

In support of these efforts, ATS will
record the stories of 50 individuals
from our recovery community who want to contribute to the
Faces and Voices of Recovery movement.

Those in recovery from addictive disorders, as well as loved ones who've journeyed with a recovering person, can support others who are still seeking recovery by telling the world "recovery is possible."*

To participate, please contact us.

  • In 2008 The Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act was signed into law by President Bush. The law requires health insurance companies to offer addiction treatment coverage benefits that are comparable to the benefits offered for other health conditions. The bill provides an example of how government policy can remedy discriminatory practices in theprivate sector.
     
  • The federal ban on student loans for people with drug convictions was passed in 1998, and is an example of how the criminalization of drugs can affect people in long term recovery. In 2006 eligibility for federal financial aid was restored to all students with prior drug convictions in an important victory for recovery advocates.
     
  • Since 1996, 16 states have enacted reforms of their disenfranchisement laws, but in Kentucky some 128,000 individuals who have served sentences for drug felony convictions are permanently disqualified from voting.
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Heroin - A Growing Problem

August 13, 2013

From 9&10 News (click to watch the news clip):

Heroin use is impacting communities across northern Michigan, but there are places ready to help.

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2013 National Prevention Week

May 13, 2013

Prevention Focus - Monday, May 13:
Prevention of Underage Alcohol Use

The Basics: Alcohol 101

ALCOHOL: is a central nervous system depressant made from organic sources including grapes, grains and berries. These products are fermented and distilled into a liquid. It is possible to drink legally in Michigan when a person is 21 years of age or older. Drinking alcohol is safe for many people if used in fairly small amounts. But if you’re under 21—or if you drink too much at any age—alcohol can be risky.

Alcohol affects every part of the body. It is carried through the bloodstream to the brain, stomach, internal organs, liver, kidneys, muscles – everywhere. It is absorbed very quickly (in as little as 5 - 10 minutes) and can stay in the body for several hours.1

  • Judgment and decision making capacity. Drinking may lead young people to engage in risky behaviors that can result in illness, injury and even death.4
  • Impulse control. Drinking lowers inhibitions and increases the chances people will do something they will regret when sober.5
  • Mood & Memory. Alcohol affects the limbic system / midbrain, which controls our moods and memory. Drinking can increase feelings of fear, sadness and anger. Impaired memory and blackouts can occur when too much alcohol is consumed.6
  • Motor coordination. This includes the ability to walk, drive and process information.7
  • Breathing, heart rate, blood pressure and other functions of the autonomic nervous system. These functions are controlled by the brainstem--the part of the brain that sustains life. Drinking too much alcohol can cause alcohol poisoning and death.

Underage Drinking is Risky Business

  • Death
  • Addiction
  • Thinking Problems
  • Arrest

Know the Signs

  • Getting drunk on a regular basis
  • Lying about how much alcohol he or she is using
  • Believing alcohol is necessary to have fun
  • Feeling run-down, depressed, or even suicidal
  • Experiencing "blackouts"--forgetting what he or she did while drinking
  • Having problems at school or getting in trouble with the law

TEENS - Do you need help now?

Recent News

  • On 5/13/13 SAMHSA unveiled a new public service announcement campaign - "Talk. They Hear You." which equips parents and caregivers with the tools and information they need to start talking with children as young as 9 years old about the dangers of underage drinking.
  • Native American youth involved in cultural activities are at reduced risk for alcohol abuse: Culture Is Our Prevention
  • Warning to the Young: Roadside Walking and Drinking Don't Mix - In 2010, 33% of all pedestrians killed in traffic crashes were legally drunk

References

  1. http://www.teendrugabuse.us/teensandalcohol.html
  2. http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AA67/AA67.pdf
  3. http://www.niaaa.nih.gov/NR/rdonlyres/117174C3-7821-4C09-90DB-BEE634DA686C/0/HarmAl.pdf
  4. http://family.samhsa.gov/media/familyguide/Underagebrochure_10_27_released_2.pdf
  5. ibid
  6. ibid
  7. ibid
  8. ibid
  9. ibid
  10. http://www.samhsa.gov/newsroom/advisories/1211193154.aspx
  11. http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AA67/AA67.pdf
  12. http://family.samhsa.gov/media/familyguide/Underagebrochure_10_27_released_2.pdf
  13. ibid
  14. ibid
  15. http://cadca.org/CoalitionResources/PP-documents/ForgottenLinkUpdated.pdf
  16. http://family.samhsa.gov/media/familyguide/Underagebrochure_10_27_released_2.pdf
  17. The Partnership at Drugfree.org

READ MORE

2013 National Prevention Week

May 13, 2013

Prevention Focus - Monday, May 13:
Prevention of Underage Alcohol Use

The Basics: Alcohol 101

ALCOHOL: is a central nervous system depressant made from organic sources including grapes, grains and berries. These products are fermented and distilled into a liquid. It is possible to drink legally in Michigan when a person is 21 years of age or older. Drinking alcohol is safe for many people if used in fairly small amounts. But if you’re under 21—or if you drink too much at any age—alcohol can be risky.

Alcohol affects every part of the body. It is carried through the bloodstream to the brain, stomach, internal organs, liver, kidneys, muscles – everywhere. It is absorbed very quickly (in as little as 5 - 10 minutes) and can stay in the body for several hours.1

  • Judgment and decision making capacity. Drinking may lead young people to engage in risky behaviors that can result in illness, injury and even death.4
  • Impulse control. Drinking lowers inhibitions and increases the chances people will do something they will regret when sober.5
  • Mood & Memory. Alcohol affects the limbic system / midbrain, which controls our moods and memory. Drinking can increase feelings of fear, sadness and anger. Impaired memory and blackouts can occur when too much alcohol is consumed.6
  • Motor coordination. This includes the ability to walk, drive and process information.7
  • Breathing, heart rate, blood pressure and other functions of the autonomic nervous system. These functions are controlled by the brainstem--the part of the brain that sustains life. Drinking too much alcohol can cause alcohol poisoning and death.

Underage Drinking is Risky Business

  • Death
  • Addiction
  • Thinking Problems
  • Arrest

Know the Signs

  • Getting drunk on a regular basis
  • Lying about how much alcohol he or she is using
  • Believing alcohol is necessary to have fun
  • Feeling run-down, depressed, or even suicidal
  • Experiencing "blackouts"--forgetting what he or she did while drinking
  • Having problems at school or getting in trouble with the law

TEENS - Do you need help now?

Recent News

  • On 5/13/13 SAMHSA unveiled a new public service announcement campaign - "Talk. They Hear You." which equips parents and caregivers with the tools and information they need to start talking with children as young as 9 years old about the dangers of underage drinking.
  • Native American youth involved in cultural activities are at reduced risk for alcohol abuse: Culture Is Our Prevention
  • Warning to the Young: Roadside Walking and Drinking Don't Mix - In 2010, 33% of all pedestrians killed in traffic crashes were legally drunk

References

  1. http://www.teendrugabuse.us/teensandalcohol.html
  2. http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AA67/AA67.pdf
  3. http://www.niaaa.nih.gov/NR/rdonlyres/117174C3-7821-4C09-90DB-BEE634DA686C/0/HarmAl.pdf
  4. http://family.samhsa.gov/media/familyguide/Underagebrochure_10_27_released_2.pdf
  5. ibid
  6. ibid
  7. ibid
  8. ibid
  9. ibid
  10. http://www.samhsa.gov/newsroom/advisories/1211193154.aspx
  11. http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AA67/AA67.pdf
  12. http://family.samhsa.gov/media/familyguide/Underagebrochure_10_27_released_2.pdf
  13. ibid
  14. ibid
  15. http://cadca.org/CoalitionResources/PP-documents/ForgottenLinkUpdated.pdf
  16. http://family.samhsa.gov/media/familyguide/Underagebrochure_10_27_released_2.pdf
  17. The Partnership at Drugfree.org

READ MORE